Misc

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Mountain Lion chasing after Bear Cub

Rock Climbing | Off Width Outlaw | Pamela Shanti Pack

This is absolutely crazy…

Ballet Dancer Sergei Polunin Simply Slays Hozier’s ‘Take Me To Church’

Just amazing!

How to Hire the Right Web Designer

Hiring a web designer or design company can seem like a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be.

Hiring a web designer or design company can seem like a daunting task. Too many speak in nerd and the good ones never seem available to take on new work.

I realize that maybe your cousin is a web designer who builds websites on the side. Or that your friend’s brother in college once updated your Tumblr in exchange for a case of beer. Or that you can, quite easily, figure out web design, programming and WordPress yourself, but you just haven’t found the time.

Web designers hear these types of comments a lot (possibly second only to “make the logo bigger” on mockups). While there’s nothing wrong with learning new things or having hobbies, for the love of whatever god you believe in, hire a professional to design and program your website. Professional, as in someone who does web design full-time, as a job that they get paid money to do, and has done so for a while.

Here’s a list of important questions to ask before you hire anyone.

  • Can you provide a list of 3-5 references I can contact?
  • Do you do this full-time and how long have you been doing web design?
  • What is your process?
  • What is the typical budget range for your projects? how are payments broken down for projects?
  • What is the typical turn-around time for your projects?
  • When can the project be started?
  • What do you need from me before we start?
  • Do your clients see a return on investment? Do you have proof of increased conversion rates or goals being achieved after you’ve done a redesign?
  • Does the price include making the site mobile friendly?
  • Will the site be supported by retina screens?
  • Do you custom design or use templates?
  • Who will own the website design when it’s paid for?
  • Do you offer maintenance or training or post-launch support?
  • Who is the contact person and who is doing the work? is anything outsourced or subcontracted out?

 Read full article…

Move Over 1024×768: The Most Popular Screen Resolution On The Web Is Now 1366×768

by Screens with a 1024×768 resolution are a bit like Windows XP: there have long been better options, but they still remained the most often used screens on the web. That is, until now. According to the latest data from StatCounter, 1366×768 screens just surpassed 1024×768 as the most popular screen resolution used by the visitors to StatCounter’s global network of sites. Three years ago, 1024×768 still accounted for almost 42% of all visitors to the roughly three million sites that use StatCounter. Today, that number has fallen to 18.6% and 1366×768 screens now account for 19.28%, up from just 0.68% in May 2009. It’s worth noting that these are global numbers. In Europe, the higher-resolution screens already overtook their predecessors late last year and in the U.S., 1024×768 still holds on to the top spot (but just barely). Read full article…

Fire Your Bad Clients

Trying to improve your company’s bottom line? If profitability is your goal, it may be time to cut some dead weight.

BY

As business owners, we often feel that we should take on every client who comes calling. But that’s not always the best choice: Just because someone comes to you who’s interested in a business relationship doesn’t mean they’re going to be a good client. In order to make your business as profitable as possible, you really need to assess your client relationships and ensure that they’re win-win opportunities for you.

Not sure this is the best idea for your business? Here are five types of clients you need to fire who are causing your business to be less profitable:

Focus drainers. In order to make the most of your time, you need to focus on your core competencies. Clients who don’t fit within your targeted service or product focus may be costing you money. Have you started offering products and services that aren’t a fit with your core business strategy just to keep some clients happy? If that’s the case, perhaps you need to reassess whether that’s a smart business move.

Low-profitability clients. If you’re not generating money-or much money-from some of your customers, then you’re on the losing end of a bad relationship. You only have so many hours in the day to work on your business, so make them count. Only work with clients with whom you’ll enjoy a good return on your invested time.

Complainers. Ever feel drained at the end of the day because you had to deal with complaining clients who always want something for nothing? It’s not worth it! It’s time to say good riddance and work with those people who truly appreciate what you do and are willing to pay for what you provide without complaining!

“Something for nothing” clients. Get rid of those customers who always want something but don’t want to pay for it. They don’t value what you have to offer, and you constantly have to justify your prices. If they don’t value you now, they never will, and you’ll constantly be justifying the work you do and the prices you charge. Only work with those people who understand the value you have to offer and will appreciate it.

Time wasters. If you’re spending time with clients who waste your time because they’re never ready or aren’t willing to listen to your advice, run now. These will be the ones that will constantly assume more of your time without providing anything in return and then will wonder why they’re paying you. You can’t help those who don’t help themselves.

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The Heartbleed Hit List: The Passwords You Need to Change Right Now

An encryption flaw called the Heartbleed bug is already being called one of the biggest security threats the Internet has ever seen. The bug has affected many popular websites and services — ones you might use every day, like Gmail and Facebook — and could have quietly exposed your sensitive account information (such as passwords and credit card numbers) over the past two years.

But it hasn’t always been clear which sites have been affected. Mashable reached out some of the most popular social, email, banking and commerce sites on the web. We’ve rounded up their responses below.

See list

Experts Find a Door Ajar in an Internet Security Method Thought Safe

By NICOLE PERLROTH

Updated | A flaw has been discovered in one of the Internet’s key security methods, potentially forcing a wide swath of websites to make changes to protect the security of consumers.

The problem was first discovered by a team of Finnish security experts and researchers at Google last week and disclosed on Monday. By Tuesday afternoon, a number of large websites, including Yahoo, Facebook, Google and Amazon Web Services, said they were fixing the problem or had already fixed it.

Researchers were still looking at the impact on consumers but warned it could be significant. Users’ most sensitive information — passwords, stored files, bank details, even Social Security numbers — could be vulnerable because of the flaw.

The most immediate advice from security experts to consumers was to wait or at least be cautious before changing passwords. Changing a password on a site that hasn’t been fixed could simply hand the new password over to hackers. Experts recommended that, before making any changes, users check a site for an announcement that it has dealt with the issue. “This is a good reminder that there are many risks online and it’s important to keep a watchful eye around what you’re doing, just as you would in the physical world,” said Zulfikar Ramzan, the chief technology officer of Elastica, a security company.

The extent of the vulnerability was unclear. Up to two-thirds of websites rely on the affected technology, called OpenSSL. But some organizations appeared to have had advance notice of the issue and had already fixed the problem by Tuesday afternoon. Many others were still working on restoring security.

Because attackers can use the bug to steal information unnoticed, it is unclear how widely the bug has been exploited — although it has existed for about two years. On Github, a website where developers gather to share code, some were posting ways to use the bug to dump information from servers. The Finnish security researchers, working for Codenomicon, a security company in Saratoga, Calif., and security researchers at Google found the bug in a portion of the OpenSSL protocol — which encrypts sessions between consumer devices and websites — called the “heartbeat” because it pings messages back and forth. The researchers called the bug “Heartbleed.”

Read on…

Heartbleed – Internet Securty Breach

by

Critical crypto bug exposes Yahoo Mail, other passwords Russian roulette-style

Lest readers think “catastrophic” is too exaggerated a description for the critical defect affecting an estimated two-thirds of the Internet’s Web servers, consider this: at the moment this article was being prepared, the so-called Heartbleed bug was exposing end-user passwords, the contents of confidential e-mails, and other sensitive data belonging to Yahoo Mail and almost certainly countless other services. The two-year-old bug is the result of a mundane coding error in OpenSSL, the world’s most popular code library for implementing HTTPS encryption in websites, e-mail servers, and applications. The result of a missing bounds check in the source code, Heartbleed allows attackers to recover large chunks of private computer memory that handle OpenSSL processes. The leak is the digital equivalent of a grab bag that hackers can blindly reach into over and over simply by sending a series of commands to vulnerable servers. The returned contents could include something as banal as a time stamp, or it could return far more valuable assets such as authentication credentials or even the private key at the heart of a website’s entire cryptographic certificate. Underscoring the urgency of the problem, a conservatively estimated two-thirds of the Internet’s Web servers use OpenSSL to cryptographically prove their legitimacy and to protect passwords and other sensitive data from eavesdropping. Many more e-mail servers and end-user computers rely on OpenSSL to encrypt passwords, e-mail, instant messages, and other sensitive data. OpenSSL developers have released version 1.0.1g that readers should install immediately on any vulnerable machines they maintain. But given the stakes and the time it takes to update millions of servers, the risks remain high. Read full article…  

Icon Talk: Choosing the Perfect Icons for Your Website

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The thing that you need to know in choosing icons for your web design is that you need to be understood and purposive. You have to be so universal that even a simpleton will understand you. You have to apply the purpose and try to achieve it in your design. A great web designer does not stop just because he is tired of looking for good icons. A great web designer will just stop, when he sees it in the website.

Truly, small things tend to have greater roles and those bits of facts can mean a great deal of inspiration. And I bet the icons agree.

Icons should be appealing and readable

They should be universal

They should be consistent

It should complement with the motif

They should be functional

Read full article…